Hewlet G. McFarlane was born in Guyana and came to the United States as a teenager. After attending high school on Long Island New York, he went to Syracuse University where he did both his undergraduate and graduate work. He earned his Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Syracuse University in 1998, after which he joined the Kenyon Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program. He also did post-doctoral research training in neuropharmacology in the Department of Psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University.

His teaching revolves around the effects of both healthy and diseased/damaged brains on behavior. His research interests, broadly defined, focus on the relationship(s) between brain chemistry and behavior with particular emphasis on mental illness. Specifically, he is interested in the interactions between neurotransmitter systems, the effects of drugs on the brain and the relationship between brain chemistry and mental illness. His current research project focuses on developing mouse models of autism and the interaction between tyrosine availability in the brain and regional dopamine release.

Hewlet maintains ongoing research collaborations with the Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience at the National Institute of Mental in Bethesda, MD and the Department of Psychiatry at the Veterans Affairs Medical Hospital in Brecksville, OH. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the International Behavioral and Neural Genetics Society, The Midwestern Psychological Association and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience.

Areas of Expertise

Neuroscience, autism, schizophrenia/depression.

Education

1998 — Doctor of Philosophy from Syracuse University

1995 — Master of Science from Syracuse University

1991 — Bachelor of Science from Syracuse University

Courses Recently Taught

This course begins with a definition of neuroscience as an interdisciplinary field, in the context of the philosophy of science. After covering the basics of cellular neurophysiology, the course examines the development and organization of the human nervous system in terms of sensory, motor, motivational, emotional and cognitive processes. The neurological and biochemical bases of various brain and behavioral disorders also are examined. It is strongly recommended that BIOL 115 or 116 is taken as a prerequisite or corequisite or have an AP score of 5 in biology. This course paired with any .50 unit neuroscience course counts toward the natural science diversification requirement. No prerequisite.

This course is designed to facilitate our learning about the connections and interactions among neuroanatomy, brain function and psychological phenomena. We do this by studying neuropsychological disorders, as well as the basic psychological processes such as perceptions and memory. Through readings, discussions and class presentations, we will learn some of the basic principles of the brain's organization and function, as well as its ability to recover function after damage. In addition, we will learn about the nature, causes and treatment of specific neuropsychological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, closed head injuries, Tourette's syndrome and stroke-induced aphasia. Further, we will learn about neuropsychological assessment and the current level of research and discovery in the neuropsychology of specific disorders through student presentations. This course paired with any neuroscience course counts toward the natural science diversification requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or 101 or NEUR 212. Offered at least every other year.

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the physiological phenomena responsible for psychological experiences. The main focus of the course is a detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. This is followed by a study of the sensory and self-regulatory systems, a study of higher cognitive processing. With each new topic, the relevant anatomical and physiological systems will be discussed as they relate to the behavior under scrutiny. Thus the biological underpinnings of sleep, mood, learning and memory, motivation and other topics will be studied. This course paired with any neuroscience course counts toward the natural science diversification requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, 110 or NEUR 212. Generally offered every year.

This course explores the biological mechanisms of the actions and effects of both legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. The course begins with a brief discussion of the history of psychopharmacology, followed by an in-depth examination of the biological basis of drug action in the brain. We will discuss the basis of drug classification and of specific drugs, including illicit drugs such as cocaine, amphetamines and heroin as well as legal psychoactive drugs such as caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. The course ends with a discussion of the action of drugs used in the treatment of mental disorders such as schizophrenia (antipsychotics) and depression (antidepressants). This course is cross-listed with psychology for diversification purposes. NEUR 305 is recommended but not required. This course paired with any neuroscience course counts toward the natural science diversification requirement.Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or NEUR 212.

This combined discussion and laboratory course aims to develop abilities for asking sound research questions, designing reasonable scientific approaches to answer such questions, and performing experiments to test both the design and the question. We consider how to assess difficulties and limitations in experimental strategies due to design, equipment, system selected, and so on. The course provides a detailed understanding of selected modern research equipment. Students select their own research problems in consultation with one or more neuroscience faculty members. This course is designed both for those who plan to undertake honors research in their senior year and for those who are not doing honors but who want some practical research experience. A student can begin the research in either semester. If a year of credit is earned, it may be applied toward the research methods course requirement for the major. This course is repeatable for up to 1.50 units of credit. Permission of instructor required. This course, taken twice, paired with any other .50 unit neuroscience course counts toward the natural science diversification requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 109Y-110Y and NEUR 212.

In the last 20 or so years, a formal collaboration has developed between the disciplines of neuroscience and philosophy. The interaction has led to dramatic changes in both disciplines. It turned out that philosophers have made a number of assumptions that do not withstand empirical scrutiny given the new experimental techniques of neuroscience. And it turned out that neuroscientists through this collaboration were able to identify conceptual errors in their discipline. The success of this interaction has led to a new thinking, particularly in the study of consciousness. In this course, we will be examining this collaborative literature. We will be reading only primary sources. Students will be expected to participate in the current debate. Students must have a major background in either philosophy or neuroscience. This course is the same as PHIL 395D. This course must be taken as PHIL 395D to count towards the humanities requirement. This course paired with any other neuroscience course and taken as NEUR 395D, counts toward the natural science requirement. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: junior standing.

This capstone seminar is required of all students who plan to graduate with a neuroscience concentration or major. The seminar is intended to bring together the knowledge acquired from courses required for, or relevant to, the concentration and major. During the course of the semester, each student will write an integrative paper with input from the instructor. Oral presentations are given in conjunction with each of these exercises. This course paired with any other .50 unit neuroscience course counts toward the natural science requirement. Neuroscience majors are expected to have completed NEUR 250 before enrolling in NEUR 471. Permission of instructor is required. Prerequisite: Neuroscience major or concentrator with senior standing, NEUR 212, and at least one 300-level neuroscience course.\n

This program for senior honors students culminates in the completion of a senior honors research project. The research is expected to be on a topic of particular relevance to the student's postgraduate plans. Students must select a research advisor from the faculty members in the Neuroscience Program. They are expected to have completed a thorough bibliographic search of the literature, written a short review paper and formulated some tentative hypotheses during the spring semester of their junior year. Permission of neuroscience director required. Prerequisite: 3.33 overall GPA and a 3.5 GPA in the neuroscience core courses and must have completed at least 5 units toward the major. Students enrolled in this course will be automatically added to NEUR 498Y for the spring semester.

This program for senior honors students culminates in the completion of a senior honors research project. The research is expected to be on a topic of particular relevance to the student's postgraduate plans. Students must select a research advisor from the faculty members in the Neuroscience Program. They are expected to have completed a thorough bibliographic search of the literature, written a short review paper and formulated some tentative hypotheses during the spring semester of their junior year. Permission of neuroscience director required. Prerequisite: 3.33 overall GPA and a 3.5 GPA in the neuroscience core courses and must have completed at least 5 units toward the major.

In the last 20 or so years, a formal collaboration has developed between the disciplines of neuroscience and philosophy. The interaction has led to dramatic changes in both disciplines. It turned out that philosophers have made a number of assumptions that do not withstand empirical scrutiny given the new experimental techniques of neuroscience. And it turned out that neuroscientists through this collaboration were able to identify conceptual errors in their discipline. The success of this interaction has led to a new thinking, particularly, in the study of consciousness. In this course, we will be examining this collaborative literature. We will be reading only primary sources. Students will be expected to participate in the current debate. Students must have a major background in either philosophy or neuroscience. This course is the same as NEUR 395D. This course must be taken as PHIL 395D to count towards the humanities requirement. This counts toward the metaphysics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission of instructor.